Hadoop, Tutorials

Hadoop 2.2.0 – Single Node Cluster

We’re going to use the the Hadoop tarball we compiled earlier to run a pseudo-cluster. That means we will run a one-node cluster on a single machine. If you haven’t already read the tutorial on building the tarball, please head over and do that first.

Geting started with Hadoop 2.2.0 — Building

Start up your (virtual) machine and login as the user ‘hadoop’. First, we’re going to setup the essentials required to run Hadoop. By the way, if you are running a VM, I suggest you kill the machine used for building Hadoop and re-start from a fresh instance of Ubuntu to avoid any issues with compatibility later. For reference, the OS we are using is 64-bit Ubuntu 12.04.3 LTS.

Continue reading “Hadoop 2.2.0 – Single Node Cluster”

Advertisements
Geek stuff, Hadoop, Linux, Tutorials

Geting started with Hadoop 2.2.0 — Building

I wrote a tutorial on getting started with Hadoop back in the day (around mid 2010). Turns out that the distro has moved on quite a bit with the latest versions. The tutorial is unlikely to work. I tried setting up Hadoop on a single-node “cluster” using Michael Knoll’s excellent tutorial but that too was out of date. And of course, the official documentation on Hadoop’s site is lame.

Having struggled for two days, I finally got the steps smoothed out and this is an effort to document it for future use.

Continue reading “Geting started with Hadoop 2.2.0 — Building”

research, Writing

Writing Better English — Avoid Very

I return with a minor post after another long break. This time, it’s about writing better English. Now, this isn’t humblebragging but I cannot be considered excellent at English writing — at least not by native standards. English is not my first language and I haven’t had much formal English education. I have, however, read a lot. Even if my English is not good, I can still point out some tips shared by experts.

Here’s the first one of those shared by Amanda Patterson on Writers Write. It’s a list of 45 words you can use to put emphasis on words without using the word “very”. I found it refreshingly helpful.

Bear in mind though that you cannot just go ahead and use a word without looking up its usage examples. Some words might have negative connotations even though the dictionary meanings look positive. For example, if you use the word ‘adequate‘ to describe someone’s work, they might be offended even though the dictionary meaning is that of acceptable quality.

p.s. After writing this, I searched for the word “very” and found two instances where I had used the word myself. I replaced it with better alternatives.