Deep Learning Experiments on Google’s GPU Machines for Free

Update: If you are interested in getting a running start to machine learning and deep learning, I have created a course that I’m offering to my dedicated readers for just $9.99. Practical Deep Learning with Keras and Python .

So you’ve been working on Machine Learning and Deep Learning and have realized that it’s a slow process that requires a lot of compute power. Power that is not very affordable. Fear not! We have a way of using a playground for running our experiments on Google’s GPU machines for free. In this little how-to, I will share a link with you that you can copy to your Google Drive and use it to run your own experiments.

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First, sign in to an account that has access to Google Drive (this would typically be any Google/Gmail account). Then, click on this link over here that has my playground document and follow the instructions below to get your own private copy.Read More »


Backup Using rsync

Here’s a mini howto on backing up files  on a remote machine using rsync. It shows the progress while it does its thing and updates any remote files while keeping files on the remote end that were deleted from your local folder.

rsync -v -r --update --progress -e ssh /media/nam/Documents/ nam@

Here,  /media/nam/Documents/ is the local folder and /media/nam/backup/documents/ is the backup folder on the machine with IP

Geting started with Hadoop 2.2.0 — Building

I wrote a tutorial on getting started with Hadoop back in the day (around mid 2010). Turns out that the distro has moved on quite a bit with the latest versions. The tutorial is unlikely to work. I tried setting up Hadoop on a single-node “cluster” using Michael Knoll’s excellent tutorial but that too was out of date. And of course, the official documentation on Hadoop’s site is lame.

Having struggled for two days, I finally got the steps smoothed out and this is an effort to document it for future use.

Read More »

AVL Tree in Python

I’ve been teaching “Applied Algorithms and Programming Techniques” and we just reached the topic of AVL Trees. Having taught half of the AVL tree concept, I decided to code it in python — my newest adventure. Bear in mind that I have never actually coded an AVL tree before and I’m not particularly comfortable with python. I thought it would be a good idea to experiment with both of them at the same time. So, I started up my python IDE (that’s Aptana Studio, btw) and started coding.

For the newbie programmer, the code itself may not be very useful since you can find better code online. The benefit is in being able to look at the process. You can take a look at the commits I made along the way over here on github. You can take a look at how I structured the code when I began and how I added bits and pieces. This abstraction should help in solving other problems as well. The final code (along with a rigorous unit test file) can be seen here:

Creating UML Sequence Diagrams with TikZ in LaTeX

Update: If you are interested in getting a concise intro to LaTeX along with my tips on best practices, checkout my course (for just $12.99) on Udemy here.

I’ve been working on my LaTeX skills for some time. The goal is to move towards an all-latex solution for writing research papers, slide sets and other documents. I’m almost there. An important goal was to be able to create all sorts of figures within LaTeX. (Well, originally, the goal was to use open source softwares to create them but it turns out that LaTeX is really good at this stuff.) The package that I’m using for graphics creation is TikZ. Here we’ll cover how we can create sequence diagrams using TikZ and a plugin package.

Here’s what we’re planning on creating.

Sequence Diagram using TikZ (click to enlarge)

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LaTeX Screencasts

I’ve started putting together a couple of screencasts for those who want to start working with LaTeX. These are aimed at the extreme newbie who wants to learn the basics and get up to speed with the typesetting tool. I’ll be updating this post as I put more videos online inshallah. For now, see the videos below or on Youtube. For best results, view in HD at full screen.

Part I: Introduction

Part II: Creating your first document
Download the files mentioned in the video from here:

Part III: Bibliographies, Class Files for Conference Styles
Download the files mentioned in the video from here:

Site Re-design

New Site Design

Last time I did a custom re-design for my site was way back during my blogspot time. That was in 2006 — five years have passed but I still like the design. When I moved to, I didn’t have a way of creating my own design so I stuck with the best design I could find. I moved to my own host here at CSRDU last year but didn’t really feel the need to create a custom design. The result, even with the great theming mechanism provided by WordPress, I never wrote a custom theme for my site. I always stuck with existing freely-available themes that always left me wanting more in one department or another. Either the typography wasn’t up to par or I didn’t like the comments layout. So, I always had to settle with whatever I could find.

That changed a couple of days ago when I came across a typography post on some blog which inspired me to begin my own wordpress theme. I had one clear goal in mind — improve readability. People come to my site mostly to read the tutorials. It’s not fair if I give text secondary importance focusing on the layout. So, I started customizing the sandbox wordpress theme. It has the cleanest markup and I was able to make all the changes simply through a custom CSS. I went with a fairly large serif font (Georgia) for the content with a sans-serif (Open Sans) font coming from Google Webfonts for the post titles. I also have a slight text shadow effect but it wont’ be visible if you’re using IE. There’s only around 5 images in the whole theme plus two fonts. So, the overall result is a fairly lean page with clear fonts and layout.

As always, all comments and criticism is most welcome.